Agile for the Enterprise

What is the difference between a 4-year-old’s birthday party and a seminar on Agile software development? The good news: there is only but one similarity, I’m pleased to assure you, and I’m speaking with the hands-on authority of somebody who just celebrated his daughter’s b-day (in the company of her closest, 20-odd fellow pink-is-my-color-princesses) and also just last week hosted a gathering of an impressive PMO Roundtable in the Midwest. This is the story of having one’s cake and eating it too (in our case, a shockingly elaborate and yes, dominantly pink-colored “Disney Princess” cake) and the PMO’s mandate of managing IT projects at the portfolio level and with annual, upfront budgets while whole-heartedly, and so it would appear, embracing Agile as a way to improve the outcome of aforementioned projects. A contradictio in terminis or simply a meltdown (as experienced when the first guest princess bit into my very own princess’s gateau) of conventions?

In what is to follow, I will be blogging about “Agile for the Enterprise” – a topic that couldn’t be any more topical, as CIO Magazine and Forrester reported only last week as well that “Agile Software Development is Now Mainstream” – and that, my dear reader, is a pronouncement that is making me incredibly nervous … And I will tell you why “Agile for everyone” is making me just a bit uneasy – there are two reasons: first, my company Talent Trust is in the business of helping clients meet their IT staffing needs by provisioning highly skilled IT professionals located offshore. If there’s one thing we’ve all heard about Agile – as even the Rugby term “Scrum” would imply – it’s that teams need to collaborate very closely in so-called “Scrum meetings” – and now I’m selfishly wondering if the world is going all-Agile, what’s going to happen to our remote services business?

My second issue is that many of my clients are PMO Professionals – and now I find myself having admittedly bizarre conversations that go along the following lines: “Sorry, Mr. Client, but you insisted on using Agile, so we’re not going to tell you how much this project is going to cost upfront, but please bring a blank check – not entirely blank, all blank that is but for your CFO’s signature, and yes, I promise you’ll be pleasantly surprised – at least I hope you will – and yes, I very well understand: hope is not a strategy – and, furthermore, if I may, please don’t disturb the artist at work – for software development is now apparently both art and science …” You get the picture.

Of course, I’m just setting the stage for my next blog where I will attempt to tie these themes together for us:

  • There are good reasons why Agile has become mainstream;
  • You can do Agile development with geographically and indeed globally distributed team – which is a fact of life for most enterprises (and hopefully means that I’ll stay in business as well!);
  • And that Agile and the PMO can work together – to potentially achieve better results in software development while conforming to such key concepts as governance, budgets, stage-gates, project management, and so forth – again all elements of how IT is managed within the enterprise.

I will be the discussing the following Agile best practices in the “how-to for the Enterprise” context:

  • How the effort estimation / budgeting process works with Scrum, and how Scrum follows project phases (stage gates);
  • How the Project Management Office (PMO) tracks actual-versus-estimates and measures performance, e.g., by Key Performance Indicator (KPIs) / Key Success Indicators (KSIs);
  • How the partnership with the business owners is established and how their collaborative involvement throughout the project is managed (potentially leading to a better alignment between IT and the business);
  • How IT managers build and deploy effective blended (onshore / offshore) teams, using some Scrum-centric best practices and monitoring tools for working with distributed resources;
  • How onshore and offshore (e.g., Argentina-based) resources collaborate as if they were in the same physical work area, delivering Agile benefits as well as cost savings;
  • How Scrum works with other Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) approaches.
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About Christophe Kolb
Christophe Kolb is Executive Chairman and co-founder of Talent Trust. Headquartered in San Francisco, Talent Trust employs mobile experts at our own development centers in Córdoba, Argentina and Lima, Peru. Our talented people are seasoned technologists with solid backgrounds in software engineering and cutting-edge skills in mobile web / HTML5, Android, iPhone / iPad, and BlackBerry. We have the technical expertise, industry knowledge, and proven capability to deliver winning mobile solutions, and have done so for some of the world’s greatest companies. Our mission is to help our enterprise clients win in mobility, with: • Captive development centers in Córdoba, Argentina and Lima, Peru • Same time zone advantage for U.S. clients, enabling real time communication • Cost-effective offshore development solutions for mobile • Focus on mobile for enterprise clients • 10-year track record of successfully servicing a blue-chip client base in predominantly multi-year relations • Agile development methodology (Scrum and Kanban) • Close collaboration with clients / Product Owners (daily stand-up meetings) • Excellent English communication skills

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