Don’t Cry for Me, Argentina

“Don’t cry for me, Argentina
The truth is I never left you
All through my wild days
My mad existence
I kept my promise, don’t keep your distance”
– Eva Perón in Evita by Andrew Lloyd Webber and lyrics by Tim Rice

In everyday life there are many successful husband-and-wife teams; I’ve personally encountered such domestic-cum-corporate duos thriving for example as restaurateurs, travel agents, certified public accountants, florists, vinotecarians, pre-Netflix vidéothèquers, European-car mechanics albeit with limited repair capabilities, temporary employment agencies, bagel store owners, expensive dry cleaners, and my favorite pedicurists whose marriage though, I sense, is a bit on a rough footing. Despite federal and state-issued labor regulations that must be prominently displayed in all work areas, including the bedroom, specifically warning of such workplace hazards as “spousal arousal,” the kinship of business and pleasure has obvious advantage (viz. merit and merriment) as well as disadvantage (for richer or poorer but never for lunch, as my wife, for one, would freely assert). (The analytically-minded will note that there are four possible outcomes when matrimonial and monetary matters conspire or collide, as the case may be: business success or failure paired with marital bliss or whatever the opposite, I dare not ponder – just compare / contrast the pairings of Cleopatra and Marcus Antonius, Annie Oakley and Frank Butler, Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, and Siegfried and Roy.)

Think about starting a technology firm with your spousal business partner? Doable indeed, as such notable Silicon Valley offspring as Cisco, Super Micro, VMware, Flickr, Bebo, and Six Apart prove. However, think about running a country together? Well, then you will have to keep up with the Kirchners. Meet Cristina and Néstor of Number One Quinta Presidencial de Olivos in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Néstor Kirchner, protean a politician, with his devil-may-care populism of near-Chávezian proportion, his on-again-off-again dislike for markets, and his fondness for decrees (having issued more than the Council of Trent), would have hated vacating the Presidential Villa at the end of his term (as anybody would), and was surely consoled by the seamless, subsequent installment of his wife, Cristina Fernández de Kirchner as President of Argentina. Cristina Kirchner, for her part, debacled into office with a creative multi-billion dollar debt retirement scheme that met the stark resistance of that marplot of her Central Bank President who opposed it and who was since decreed-over multiple times, Kirchner-style. With plummeting popularity ratings at home and the national press infuriated (and who cares about  international opinion?), she’s done well to focus on all-out capitalistic reforms (despite nationalizing the country’s private pension funds), taking it perhaps too far with a few dubious development deals of her own that would put even Donald Trump to shame (alongside a fashion decorum to make the Real Housewives of Orange County blush). Luckily for the Kirchners (and the country, of course), a vast amount of oil – estimated at some 60 billion barrels – has been discovered in Argentina’s inshore waters and is certain to now unleash another economic boom. With Argentina’s farm-commodity exports at an all-time high and inflation generally in check, the country under the Kirchners resembles a lush economical oasis in the financial isthmus of Latin America.

Our darling husband-and-wife team, credited with bringing Argentina back into the centerfold of world economic power through political stability, industrial growth, and rising prosperity is following in the footsteps, of course, of another ruling couple, Juan and Isabel Perón, whose style of government in the fifties known as Peronism, that farcical ideological wavering between socialism and capitalism, has for so long managed to hold back a country with just extraordinary potential (given immense natural resources, a highly developed economy and powerful middle class, strong historical ties to European culture, etc.). That Argentina is not yet a G10 or at least an economy the size of Italy’s ($558 billion GDP vs. $1.756 trillion) has famously perplexed V. S. Naipaul who calls it “one of the great mysteries of the twentieth century.” The hangover of Peronism perhaps? Yep, the Argies sure like their colorful husband-and-wife leaders, able as a country, however, to withstand and endure even a bad choice of leadership. Don’t cry for me, Argentina? (Here’s the answer to that one: towards the end of her mad existence, Eva Perón stipulated in her will that Liza Minnelli would be expressly barred from playing Evita, for the good people of Argentina had already suffered too much; she kept her promise; and the children of the Pampas never did shed a tear.)

Argentina is one of my favorite countries in the world. In his day job, your blogger has been working with Argentinean business partners for over ten years. With a demographically young and dynamic population of 40 million, a world-class educational system that’s produced more Nobel Prize winners in the sciences than all other South American countries put together, and a higher adult literacy rate than Greece, Argentina’s workforce can be reckoned with on an international scale. The country’s cultural roots are European and very much like the United States it is a nation formed by settlers and immigrants, affording both Europeans and Americans a great deal of cultural similarity and indeed familiarity. The vast majority of the contemporary workforce employed in science, engineering, and technology speaks English which is taught in school mandatorily as the primary foreign language. The people I’ve had the pleasure of working with over the years have not only excelled in their respective fields of specialization but have distinguished themselves as problem solvers, creative thinkers, and innovative contributors; I’ve witnessed entrepreneurship, hard work, and professional pride to degrees desirable for the even the best companies or institutions here in the States.

If you’re thinking about working with a remote IT team, one of Argentina’s most compelling advantages besides boasting a wealth of excellent technical talent at competitive offshore rates is the time zone overlap with both the U.S. and Europe. Just look at your world clock: 8:00 AM in Chicago, is 10:00 AM in Buenos Aires, is 1:00 PM in London, meaning that both Chicago and London will have their respective eight-hour day overlap with Buenos Aires in terms of regular business hours. In other words, Argentina is ideally situated to serve both the U.S. and Europe as “nearshore” destinations for real-time collaboration (think about just being able to Skype your remote colleague in say Buenos Aires in the middle of your day to catch up on a project’s status, as opposed to getting up at the crack of dawn or burning the midnight oil, getting caught up with resources sitting in say Bangalore, India).

It must also be said that you won’t like Argentina if: you are a member of the bovine family (yes, you will get eaten, as this is by a wide but gastroenterologically not-so-healthy margin the world’s biggest beef-eating nation); you are a Malbec grape (you’ll get squashed with Argentina now ranking as the fifth-leading producer of wine in the world); or you get dizzy dancing (Argentina, you’ve got the best dancers in the world – just bite me, Brazil!). Load up your iPod with Astor Piazzolla tangos to relive the magic of the Pampas or the romance of a sultry Buenos Aires evening from afar, and let me summarize why Argentina is possibly your best bet for a remote IT destination:

  • A politically stable nation with a fast-growing diversified economy, vast natural resources, strong at exporting and at the cusp of an energy-sector boom;
  • A large population, with a young demographic and a prevalent middle class;
  • A superb educational system that, with the government’s support, is fostering education and job training in science, engineering, and technology (where the U.S. educational system, in contrast, is desperately lacking);
  • Technical universities across the country produce a wealth of highly-skilled IT professionals;
  • A high penetration of advanced English as a foreign language, both spoken and written, especially among IT professionals;
  • An established and fast-growing IT services industry based on entrepreneurial spirit and technical excellence;
  • IT services exports are strongly encouraged by the government with various incentive programs to further propagate the benefits of a ‘knowledge economy’ (investing in people, non-polluting revenues, currency influx);
  • Cultural similarity with both Europe and North America greatly eases cross-cultural work collaboration;
  • High work ethic, pride in ownership, and innovative ‘out-of-the-box’ thinking are common characteristics;
  • Almost full-working-day time zone overlap with both the U.S. and Europe means you can work with people in Argentina in ‘real time’;
  • And perhaps, most significantly of all if you’re looking for “value for money”: given all the above benefits, Argentina outsourcing is still very much price-competitive compared to most other offshore locations, with savings that can range from 30-50% compared to the cost of domestic staff.

The World Is Not Flat, And Good Help Is Still Hard To Find (Apologies, Tom Friedman)

There is many a pearl of wisdom to be found in Berkshire Hathaway Inc.’s celebrated Shareholder Letter, where in its most recent installment, Warren E. Buffett, the great value investor, Sage of Omaha, and all-around good (and very rich) guy issues the following warning: “Don’t ask the barber if you need a haircut.” Something about wandering into Lloyd Blankfein’s office and wondering if you should be doing more M&A deals. Tougher Wall Street regulations? For the birds! Having Goldman Sachs traders worry about global risk management – like having Saddam Hussein watch over your nuclear weapons stockpile or the brothers at Delta Tau Chi curate your wine cellar. The point: don’t ask me whether you need a remote IT workforce …

Instead, ask any economist what would happen if a given commodity – such as oil or lithium, hey you, I’m-sitting-on-a-thousand-laptop-batteries Tesla-driver – became scarce, and you might just receive a textbook, two-part answer: firstly, make more efficient use of what you have (indeed the hybrid car comes to mind); and secondly, explore alternate sources towards the same end (think windmills and solar panels). And if consumption cannot be limited regardless, the price of that commodity will, of course, continue to rise.

Whether you’re filling up at the gas station, amping your Prius, or filling positions for IT professionals as your company’s hiring manager, you’ll encounter much of the same problem: IT talent – as a local market commodity – has become preciously scarce and hence expensive and difficult to procure. And just like discussions around our Nation’s dependency on (mostly foreign) oil and other precious goods, it is impossible today not to consider the local-global context behind the demand for and supply of IT talent. Given the post-recession blues that surround us, it may come as a counter-intuitive shocker that government estimates put the shortfall in talent still this year at 10 million individuals – which it measures as the number of domestic workers required in order to just keep up with the nation’s productivity levels. (On that very point, however, on how we did manage through a jobless recovery, increasing productivity with fewer workers, I’ve just witnessed a most Dilbert-esque exchange in our Silicon Valley office, with folks now associating being no longer stuck in traffic for hours on their morning commute along the nightmarish Highway 101 as “great for me but unhealthy for the economy.”)

Driven by such irreversible demographic macro-trends as declining birth rates and the coming vacuum left by the soon-to-retire Baby Boomer generation paired with steadily dropping enrollment rates for science graduates, the impending “Talent Shortage” will become one of our great economic challenges for decades to come (making assorted trading-floor shenanigans of recent memory look paltry). Already – and especially in the field of IT – it is taking hiring managers longer to find fewer qualified candidates at higher salary levels (even in a job market where anybody fit to as much as just fog a mirror is applying for Java developer roles). (And it is perhaps a troubling matter of fact that the U.S. produces more board-certified sports therapists than computer scientists; and in Germany, another fast-aging country, there are now more landscape architects than electrical engineers.)

The Talent Shortage – I predict – will bring out the textbook economist in all the rest of us: either we make our existing people more efficient, and/or we find alternate (non-domestic, speak global) sources of talent. (The former, an exercise in what is known as “talent management,” is about creating just the right match between work and worker as well as striking an optimal balance between full- / part-time workers and internal / external positions.) The latter, often referred to as “remote staff augmentation,” works on the principle that there is an asymmetric distribution between work and workers in high- and low-cost countries, respectively (for example: the U.S. or Germany vs. Brazil, Bulgaria, or India); and that it is more practical (in most cases and for all parties concerned) to move the work, and not the worker (see my previous blog).

There are some fundamental changes in the world of work that are re-shaping the nature of both the workplace and the workforce; changes brought about by technology and globalization that are calling into question the traditional proximity between the work and the worker. Most IT professionals today have experience with distributed development teams – either as part of a geographically dispersed organization across multiple office locations or during the course of working with an offshore services provider. The notion that IT (and other forms of knowledge-) work can be done remotely, in a virtual fashion, now seems hardly revolutionary.

Just a quick statistical account of ‘Remote Working / Teleworking’ here in the States and in Europe will help make the point:

  • “It is estimated that 100 million U.S. workers will telecommute by 2010.” (Kiplinger)
  • “In a survey of 178 U.S. businesses with between 20 and 99 employees, the Yankee Group found that 79% had mobile workers, with an average of 11 mobile workers per company and 54% had telecommuters, with an average of eight telecommuters per company.” (Yankee Group)
  • “15% of the EU workforce can be described as ‘mobile workers’ (spending more than 10 working hours per week away from home and their main place of work) and 4% as mobile teleworkers.” (Statistical Indicators Benchmarking the Information Society)

Through remote staff augmentation, employers can remotely deploy individuals (and teams of individuals) across geographic distances and time zones, managing them and collaborating with them (almost) just as effectively as if they were all in one physical location. This is typically accomplished through enabling processes and technologies – giving rise to something akin to a “Virtual Workplace,” a collaborative and often web-based environment for performing distributed work. By electronically moving the work, rather than physically placing the worker, employers can effectively augment their local staff with global talent that is situated off-site for tasks that can be performed remotely. And given the sheer population size and ample talent pools in many low-cost countries (my current “there-is-IT-services-export-beyond-India” favorites include: Philippines, Argentina, Ukraine, Egypt, Vietnam – but let us revisit again China next year), seemingly poised to do just the opposite from our high-cost countries in terms of high fertility rates and the wholesale graduation of IT workers, the long-term fundamentals behind global talent sourcing appear to be solid.

To be an effective strategy to address the Talent Shortage remote staff augmentation must be implemented (and its effectiveness continuously measured) along the following three success factors:

  • Access – give yourself the flexibility you need to meet all your skills requirements, as the likelihood of finding just one offshore partner that has the breadth, depth, and ready availability of all skills required is low (consider multi-vendor arrangements for reasons of both readiness and redundancy);
  • Quality – remember the adage “quality is not a function of size;” find suitably sized offshore partners that will commit quality resources, regardless of business volume (there are thousands of high-quality firms in India alone that may be successfully engaged on smaller or mid-sized projects – i.e., for business volumes generally too low for the top-tier Indian vendors);
  • Cost – follow a diversified country approach and be careful not to over-invest in one particular offshore location which may overheat due to popularity.

If indeed the world is flat (as it has been famously and convincingly argued), or at least, if the world is becoming bigger and smaller at the same time, the dual realities of a global workforce and a virtual workplace are forcing us to simply think differently about workers and their work. Remote staff augmentation is a key part of that new thinking, as the Talent Shortage combined with rising cost pressures and the fact that many of today’s IT jobs can be performed remotely, call for a more global and virtual view of talent acquisition and delivery.

The Death of Distance – The Sequel

Call me a techie, something of a science-minded Skeptic who looks upon the ever-growing shelf of self-help titles for the executive set (and aspiring cadre) with a mixture of some bewilderment, little amusement-cum-disdain, and lots of professional jealousy. How come “they” have it and “we in IT” don’t? Meaning the inspired and adapted learnings of history’s greats to better one’s management skills. Just imagine our very own reading list: “Metternich on Winning Over Business Owners,” “George Smith Patton III, the Gatling Gun, and the Importance of IT,” or “À la Bonaparte – Supreme Power to the Little Guy” …

Nothing, however, beats management by Sun Tzu, his 6th century BC The Art of War a timeless classic on military strategy and thought. This enduring treatise which is, of course, shockingly contemporary in parts, stresses the importance of deception, cunning, and spying on others; not doing what you say you’re going to do emerges as the leitmotif, while it offers helpful advice on how to turn spies, punish turncoats, poison wells, and generally deal away with modern-day peasants in feudal lands, speak voiceless underlings. Self-proclaimed Machiavellian corporate strivers and intriguers may be strangely drawn to Il Principe, short enough of a posthumous Renaissance political essay to be digested between cafeteria lunches, where readers will be instructed in the method of acquiring necessary ends by any means, even if they are cruel. Supply chain management (SCM) types will find well-founded solace in being the rightful heirs to no other than Gaius Julius Caesar, partly-Consul and mostly-Dictator of the Roman Republic, his only regret when crossing the Rubicon not having had the SAP BI Platform to help track the dwindling corn supplies which would cripple his Gallic campaign. And finally, if you’ve been too successful a manager, beaten the competition to a pulp, and even your grinning shareholders are worried about your Emotional Intelligence (EI) score, there’s always Hildegard of Bingen to help you get back in touch with your inner Medieval Benedictine abbess, herbalist, poet, and channeller (the lesson there: don’t be afraid of your own success!).

But no, we (in IT) shall have none of that! We prefer such solemn encouragement as “attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference” from noted statesman, gifted orator, and arguably one of the greatest 20th century task masters in a distributed environment, The Right Honourable Sir Winston Churchill. Churchill managed one of the largest physically distributed field operations of his days by a set of rules that are prescriptive for any remote IT engagement:

  • Plan (vigorously);
  • Communicate (constantly);
  • Collaborate (and get the best out of others);
  • Be proactive (and always visible);
  • Govern (keep and refine metrics of success);
  • And, of course, persist (never, never, never give up – remember this is the man who said: “If you’re going through hell, keep going.”).

To optimize outcomes, Churchill was fond of running alternative scenarios, a quick A vs. B “hypothesis testing” for every decision he made. I’ve applied the same method, including some probing questions, for helping us determine an optimal approach for setting up a remote resourcing environment:

  • Captive vs. Non-Captive:
    The benefits of a captive offshore operation are obvious (dedicated resources, significant cost savings after start-up costs are recouped / no middleman, full control / security, quality imprint, in-house culture / communication, in-market sales presence, etc.); but some of the drawbacks may be less obvious (static resourcing / difficulties with right-skilling and load-balancing, dependence on single geography / economy / labor market can mean wage inflation / talent shortage / staff attrition, bench- and lead-time challenges responding to user demand, etc.). What criteria would you use to weigh the benefits/drawbacks of a captive vs. a non-captive offshore operation?
  • “DIY” vs. Managing Vendor:
    Faced with the task of setting up and managing a portfolio of multiple, sequential vendor relations, what ‘value equation’ would persuade you to outsource vs. in-house the management of that portfolio? (E.g., managing-vendor expertise, economies of scale associated with managing the costs of (sequential) vendor discovery, setup, transition, and ongoing coordination, etc.)?
  • Single Partner- vs. Multi-Vendor:
    When considering a non-captive offshore operation, what decision criteria would you use to establish a partner-based vs. a vendor-based approach? (E.g., cost- / risk-sharing, price breaks based on volume, other commitments from a single partner vs. “best-of-breed” every time / breadth and depth, flexibility / no single point of dependence when sourcing from multiple vendors, etc.)
  • Tier-1 vs. Tier-2:
    What is your experience working with tier-1 vs. tier-2 vendors? (E.g., professionalism, process maturity / CMM:5 vs. entrepreneurship, “working with heroes,” etc.). Can you relate to the statement “quality is not a function of size”?
  • Offshore Success – Inhibitors vs. Enablers:
    In your experience, what are some of the key inhibitors (e.g., potential lack of capital, scale, reach, process maturity, ‘hidden costs of offshoring,’ etc.) and enablers (e.g., people, process, technology) to offshoring success? Do effective Service Level Agreements (SLAs) increase the chances of success?
  • India vs. ‘The Rest of the World’:
    Have you had experience resourcing from some of the “other” offshore regions: South America (e.g., Argentina, Brazil), Eastern Europe (e.g., Romania, Ukraine), North Africa/Egypt, Southeast Asia (e.g., Vietnam), China? How would you relate this to your ‘India experience,’ if any, in terms of critical success factors (e.g., quality, flexibility, cost – i.e., is India – with its ~30% staff turnover and ~20% wage inflation – trending after Ireland which priced itself out of the call-center business in the 90s?)?
  • Synchronous vs. Asynchronous:
    What are the key drivers for you to insist on time zone overlap to enable synchronous (e.g., U.S. / South America) vs. asynchronous collaboration (e.g., U.S. / India)? What experience have you had, if any, with more advanced “follow-the-sun” and multiple-shift 24×7 development / support models?
  • Standalone vs. Distributed:
    Have you noticed an increase in complexity managing remote resources as part of a distributed (onsite-offsite) team vs. managing them on a standalone basis?
  • The “Impossible Triangle” of Quality, Flexibility (Availability), and Cost – Tradeoff vs. Optimal:
    Trying to optimize all three dimensions (quality/flexibility/cost – or for project-based work: scope/schedule/cost), how would you prioritize them in order to further drive profitable growth? Furthermore, how important is the “4th” dimension (control)? Does the (relative) importance of control (project management / outcomes ownership) influence your structuring of offshoring engagements: staff augmentation vs. project outsourcing, Time & Materials (T&M) vs. Fixed-Price Contracts?
  • Today vs. Tomorrow:
    Is the impending shortfall in workers and skills (“Talent Shortage/War For Talent”) due to demographics / macroeconomics already impacting your firm? Or, impacting your future resource planning? And, given how technology and globalization are re-shaping both the workplace and the workforce, are you looking at alternate strategies for sourcing and deploying talent (globally, virtually)?

Afraid of The Invisible Man (or the Remote IT Worker)?

Whenever I travel extensively and am naturally engaged in a remote working relationship with my colleagues from head office, I experience first-hand the chief tenet of our firm’s value proposition to clients: that with a little know-how just about anybody can tap into and benefit from a remote workforce. Whether you’re already part of a distributed IT organization with geographically dispersed teams, or you wish to engage remote workers in order to source or supplement skills that are locally scarce or unavailable, or whether you’re in the market to save money with offshoring, a number of key Do’s and Don’ts apply.

Although there are different engagement models when it comes to working remotely (e.g., managing a remote individual or stand-alone team vs. managing that individual or team as part of a larger and by definition even more distributed team), and hence different best-practice prescriptions exist for how to maximize the chances of a successful engagement, I will share a list of common success factors that make up what I call the “Parity Principle.”

For the sake of argument, our Parity Principle says that in order to make working with a remote person (located say in Buenos Aires, Argentina) as effective as working with someone in the proverbial cubicle next door, there is additional requisite behavioral activity that, when conducted properly, creates efficiency that, over time, offsets the “cost” of the behavioral change required in the first place. While there is in fact a scientific basis for measuring changes in management behavior and concomitant productivity levels, I will give you a commonsensical intuition for what this principle is all about.

Imagine you’re an IT manager and you’ve just called up your local recruiter to help fill an open, say highly specialized and three-month position with a local consultant. The contractor now reports for duty on Monday morning, and is presumably given a desk to work and shown a tour of the facilities, while you collect your thoughts on how best to familiarize, indoctrinate, and instruct your newest team member in order to make him or her as productive as possible on the task at hand. Communication with the consultant on the first day, for the first week, or for that matter for the entire three-month duration, can be spontaneous, on an as-needed basis in order to answer any questions or resolve any issues. And then there is always the iconic water cooler around which co-workers congregate for informal team discussions, and where even a slight gesture or expression of frustration can be more meaningful than a red-flagged item on the project’s Gantt chart. And lastly, you keep regular taps on your consultant using the most effectual management technique known since Peter Ferdinand Drucker left his native Vienna: managing by walking around (in other words, a quick stroll to the cubicle, a quick status check, a look at the screen, and you’re in the know again).

Now compare and contrast the situation with a remote IT worker. All the management activities are the same, but in general everything takes a little more preparation, a little more formality (watch out water cooler, here comes the water wiki!), and a little more follow-up. The Parity Principle now asserts that all that “little more” that is required to manage in a distributed work environment will accrue to the overall benefit of the project and the team (tangible results through a slight perhaps but measurable increase in standardization, formalization, and day-to-day discipline). A short-list of the most common success factors then looks like the following:

  • Planning (on behalf of the local manager);
  • Communication;
  • Collaboration tools;
  • Proactivity (on behalf of the remote IT worker);
  • Governance processes for a distributed IT environment.

In my next blog I will discuss these key factors in detail and within the offshore context. Of course, the world of work is rife with anecdotes of how, for example, communication with the “invisible worker” can be especially challenging when not only bridging geographic but in addition cultural distances. (An old favorite comes to mind that chronicles the travails of a German radio operator at high seas fielding the desperate plea for help of a sinking American vessel; listening in anguish to the repeated “Help, we are sinking” calls, he finally musters the courage to respond in English: “Yes, I hear you, but what are you sinking about?”)

Agile for the Enterprise

What is the difference between a 4-year-old’s birthday party and a seminar on Agile software development? The good news: there is only but one similarity, I’m pleased to assure you, and I’m speaking with the hands-on authority of somebody who just celebrated his daughter’s b-day (in the company of her closest, 20-odd fellow pink-is-my-color-princesses) and also just last week hosted a gathering of an impressive PMO Roundtable in the Midwest. This is the story of having one’s cake and eating it too (in our case, a shockingly elaborate and yes, dominantly pink-colored “Disney Princess” cake) and the PMO’s mandate of managing IT projects at the portfolio level and with annual, upfront budgets while whole-heartedly, and so it would appear, embracing Agile as a way to improve the outcome of aforementioned projects. A contradictio in terminis or simply a meltdown (as experienced when the first guest princess bit into my very own princess’s gateau) of conventions?

In what is to follow, I will be blogging about “Agile for the Enterprise” – a topic that couldn’t be any more topical, as CIO Magazine and Forrester reported only last week as well that “Agile Software Development is Now Mainstream” – and that, my dear reader, is a pronouncement that is making me incredibly nervous … And I will tell you why “Agile for everyone” is making me just a bit uneasy – there are two reasons: first, my company Talent Trust is in the business of helping clients meet their IT staffing needs by provisioning highly skilled IT professionals located offshore. If there’s one thing we’ve all heard about Agile – as even the Rugby term “Scrum” would imply – it’s that teams need to collaborate very closely in so-called “Scrum meetings” – and now I’m selfishly wondering if the world is going all-Agile, what’s going to happen to our remote services business?

My second issue is that many of my clients are PMO Professionals – and now I find myself having admittedly bizarre conversations that go along the following lines: “Sorry, Mr. Client, but you insisted on using Agile, so we’re not going to tell you how much this project is going to cost upfront, but please bring a blank check – not entirely blank, all blank that is but for your CFO’s signature, and yes, I promise you’ll be pleasantly surprised – at least I hope you will – and yes, I very well understand: hope is not a strategy – and, furthermore, if I may, please don’t disturb the artist at work – for software development is now apparently both art and science …” You get the picture.

Of course, I’m just setting the stage for my next blog where I will attempt to tie these themes together for us:

  • There are good reasons why Agile has become mainstream;
  • You can do Agile development with geographically and indeed globally distributed team – which is a fact of life for most enterprises (and hopefully means that I’ll stay in business as well!);
  • And that Agile and the PMO can work together – to potentially achieve better results in software development while conforming to such key concepts as governance, budgets, stage-gates, project management, and so forth – again all elements of how IT is managed within the enterprise.

I will be the discussing the following Agile best practices in the “how-to for the Enterprise” context:

  • How the effort estimation / budgeting process works with Scrum, and how Scrum follows project phases (stage gates);
  • How the Project Management Office (PMO) tracks actual-versus-estimates and measures performance, e.g., by Key Performance Indicator (KPIs) / Key Success Indicators (KSIs);
  • How the partnership with the business owners is established and how their collaborative involvement throughout the project is managed (potentially leading to a better alignment between IT and the business);
  • How IT managers build and deploy effective blended (onshore / offshore) teams, using some Scrum-centric best practices and monitoring tools for working with distributed resources;
  • How onshore and offshore (e.g., Argentina-based) resources collaborate as if they were in the same physical work area, delivering Agile benefits as well as cost savings;
  • How Scrum works with other Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) approaches.